Mount Sutro: An Electronic Periodical

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The Sun Is The Same In A Relative Way

A vintage Anchor Hocking Early American Prescut glass relish dish, line number 700-series with pressed Star of David and fan pattern circa 1960–1978, on a table with full place settings in the officer's wardroom aboard the Treasury-class U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Ingham WHEC-35 (1936).

USCGC Ingham Maritime Museum, Southard Street, Key West, Florida: Saturday, 18 January 2020

part of the Key West 2020 album


Despite the fact that I was cognizant of it in advance, circumstances allowed me to forget anyway. Pre-occupied getting ready for and ultimately participating in my mother's birthday camping weekend in and around Fort De Soto County Park in Pinellas County, Florida, I ultimately neglected to acknowledge in time a personally-relevant vicennial on the same date, Sunday, 26 September 2021.

As unbelievable as it is to me, that date marked the twentieth anniversary of Mount Sutro.

The rate at which I develop and process photographs, research and write articles, and ultimately publish them all here may be intermittent, but with a library of over 88,300 photographs (1.38 terabytes) many of which are as yet unpublished, a full supply of content remains to keep me busy for another few decades. In the meantime, I continue to travel and capture additional images, building memories and article material for the future.

By the way, if you happen to wonder what a Coast Guard cutter's wardroom has to do with this website's anniversary, the answer is, well, nothing. However, I can offer that the glass relish dish photographed aboard USCGC Ingham is seemingly identical to one owned by my mother and that I recall from the dinner table in her home.

The voyage continues… thank you for coming along.

The Seeds That Were Silent All Burst Into Bloom

A red powder puff (Calliandra haematocephala) flower head at the Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center.

22301 SW 162nd Avenue, Miami, Florida: Sunday, 17 January 2021

part of the Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center album


After I was fortunate to photograph a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) — see The Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Pictorial — at Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center in agricultural and rural western Miami-Dade County, I noticed a fascinating plant flowering nearby, the red powder puff (Calliandra haematocephala).

The red powder puff is a "large, multiple-trunked, low-branching, evergreen shrub [with] silky leaflets that are glossy copper when new, turning to a dark metallic green." Its most noticeable feature are its large blooming flowers, which are "two to three inches across, of watermelon pink, deep red, or white silky stamens, produced during warm months." The buds resemble raspberries prior to the flowers opening.

Although non-native to North America, red powder puff is "not considered a problem species" in Florida. Its range includes South Florida and parts of Central Florida; areas of southern Texas, Arizona, Nevada and California; and coastal California. Their presence at Castellow Hammock is logical as they are attractive to hummingbirds, butterflies and bees.

The Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Pictorial

A female or immature ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) sitting within a large mandarin hat (Holmskioldia sanguinea) plant at the Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center.

22301 SW 162nd Avenue, Miami, Florida: Sunday, 17 January 2021

part of the Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center album


Even though I often see them visiting flowers on my property and have observed them elsewhere in the past, the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) has always been fast and elusive enough to avoid my camera. That finally changed during a recent visit to Castellow Hammock Preserve and Nature Center in agricultural and rural western Miami-Dade County. In the area for winter, the hummingbirds will stay until March and then fly back north for spring.

There were several individuals flying in and around a large mandarin hat (Holmskioldia sanguinea) plant in front of the visitor center building. As I looked inside the plant, I saw a female or immature hummingbird sitting on a branch. For nearly twenty seconds she sat there while I took ten photographs — much to my delight — six of which are decent and presented herein.

Although I did not get to hike the park's tropical hardwood forest trail due to the late hour, it was certainly worth the visit just to see and photo the hummingbirds up close.