Mount Sutro: An Electronic Periodical

221022017
1349Hours EST

The Obnubilation of Dextrorotation

The lights of antenna towers off Sand Hill Road, downtown parking garage at the Hershey Story building and street lamps of Park Boulevard as seen from the 250-foot Kissing Tower (1975) at Hersheypark.

100 West Hersheypark Drive, Hershey, Pennsylvania: 01 July 2014

part of the Hersheypark album


Triptych Three: "Beneath the Glow"

The Internal Transduction of Light
The Obnubilation of Dextrorotation
The Optical Bokashi Aberration

The Breeze Was All I Heard

Marc Malonzo photographs the landscape of redwood and oak forests and Bon Tempe Lake reservoir from atop the Mount Tamalpais East Peak summit at the end of the Plank Walk Trail in Mount Tamalpais State Park.

Near East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Marin County, California: 29 January 2013

part of the Mount Tamalpais State Park album


Triptych Two: "Who Watches the Watchers"

The Everlasting Moments of Your Youth
The Different Kind of Sunday Morning
The Breeze Was All I Heard

The Different Kind of Sunday Morning

A member of United States Air Force Reserve 403d Wing 53d Weather Reconnaissance Squadron 'Hurricane Hunters' photographs two visitors in front of WC-130J Hercules 75304.

Near 3256 Capital Circle Southwest, Tallahassee, Florida: 22 May 2014

part of the NOAA Hurricane Awareness Tour album


Triptych Two: "Who Watches the Watchers"

The Everlasting Moments of Your Youth
The Different Kind of Sunday Morning
The Breeze Was All I Heard

The Everlasting Moments of Your Youth

A young man photographs a sea turtle and fish with his telephone in the underwater viewing area of the 'TurtleTrek' exhibit at SeaWorld Orlando.

7007 Sea World Drive, Orlando, Florida: 28 December 2013

part of the SeaWorld Orlando album


Triptych Two: "Who Watches the Watchers"

The Everlasting Moments of Your Youth
The Different Kind of Sunday Morning
The Breeze Was All I Heard

The Voltage To Your Power Line

Electricity pylons carrying power lines over the Allegheny River and Quaker Run Road (New York State Route 280) near the western entrance to Allegany State Park.

Quaker Run Road (NYS Route 280) near Pine Creek Road, Steamburg, New York: 26 June 2014

part of the Allegany State Park album


Triptych One: "Hybrid"

The Tonga Room Phenomenon
The Walls Are Just the Cover of a Book
The Voltage To Your Power Line

The Nerodia Taxispilota of Manatee Springs Run

A brown water snake (Nerodia taxispilota) in the vegetation lining Manatee Springs Run at the headspring of Manatee Springs State Park.

Near NW 115th Street, Chiefland, Florida: 11 October 2014

part of the Manatee Springs State Park album


Harmless and nonvenomous, the brown water snake (Nerodia taxispilota) is one of the many species of animal that I got to experience up close during an October 2014 camping trip to Manatee Springs State Park.

They are good swimmers and good climbers. I saw several swimming in Manatee Springs Run and many could be found basking in the sun on the limbs of vegetation along the run. Near the headspring where I saw the most brown water snakes, a group of park guests were swimming about fifty feet away, completely oblivious to the herpetological wonders lurking nearby.

And just as it should be too, mankind coexisting peacefully with nature. Too many people have an illogical fear of snakes in particular and irrationally promote the killing of any snake they happen upon. Then again, it is the historically classic reaction of humankind to exterminate whatever it fears or does not understand.

Although there is nothing to fear from these creatures — unless you happen to be a small fish or frog — the Florida Museum of Natural History does share a somewhat spine-tingling cautionary note regarding the brown water snake.

"The brown water snake is a good climber and can found twenty feet up in trees, though it is most frequently seen basking on tree limbs that extend above the water. When frightened by a rapidly approaching boat, it will escape by jumping off the limb into the water. Occasionally its attempt to flee comes too late and they fall not into the water, but into the boat."

With that amusing (because you are not there in the boat) thought, canoeists take note: keep your vessels clear of tree limbs extending over the surface of Florida's waterways.